Water shortage in Colorado River due to climate change

The Colorado River, which supplies water to close to 40 million people in the Southwest, has been declared to be experiencing a historic water shortage by the federal government. Ben Tracy, a national environmental correspondent for CBS News, reported

The federal government has declared a Tier 2a water shortage for the first time ever. This means that Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada will have to use less water from Lake Mead starting in the new year. Arizona will have to reduce its water withdrawals by 21%, Nevada by 8%, and Mexico by 7%; California, the river’s largest water user, opted not to make any changes.

For Colorado River operations, the federal government already issued a first-of-its-kind Tier 1 shortage declaration last year. Arizona took the biggest hit and had to scale back water deliveries to its cotton and alfalfa farmers as a result of that declaration’s requirement that Nevada, Mexico, and Arizona reduce their water intake from the river in accordance with a drought contingency plan signed back in 2019.

The same states are subject to additional cuts under the new Tier 2a declaration, and Arizona is once again the hardest hit. In addition to the 500,000 acre-feet it lost in the previous round, the state will now lose an additional 80,000 acre-feet of water, or one-fifth of its total allotment. (Approximately 320,000 gallons make up an acre-foot.

#news #climate #coloradoriver

Teirstein, Z. (2022, August 16). Federal government announces historic water cuts as Colorado River falls to new lows. Grist. Retrieved December 28, 2022, from https://grist.org/politics/federal-government-announces-historic-water-cuts-as-colorado-river-falls-to-new-lows/

Ramirez, E. N. (2022, August 16). New water cuts coming for Southwest as Colorado River falls into Tier 2 shortage | CNN. CNN. Retrieved December 28, 2022, from https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/16/us/colorado-river-water-cuts-lake-mead-negotiations-climate/index.html

Three rivers across the globe are under threat

Rivers are very important to modern life because they bring towns food, water, and electricity. But because of the constant heat waves and drought, the important water sources have dried up.

Rivers are very important to modern life because they bring towns food, water, and electricity. But because of the constant heat waves and drought, the important water sources have dried up. a worldwide special report on the water crisis that is affecting billions of people.

The Colorado River, the Rhine River in Germany, and the Yangtze River in China are the three rivers that NBC correspondents Steve Patterson, Matt Bradley, and Janis Mackey Frayer are visiting to observe how climate change is affecting these three vital rivers to their respective regions.

What is Climate Change? | Start Here

The real numbers behind global warming, a problem that has come to define our age. Even the world leaders convening for climate negotiations at Cop25 this year are aware that we aren’t doing enough to halt climate change.

We are actually moving backward. According to the UN, the globe is on course to warm by 3.2 degrees before the end of the century as a result of rising carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere. Communities all around the world are already suffering as a result of that acceleration.The Start Here episode from this week cuts through the politics and science to give you the information you need to understand what’s at risk for the world.

#Aljazeenglish
#StartHere