France and Germany set to revoke sanctions on Russian grains and fertilizers

Following the Russian military invasion of Ukraine, the EU imposed a series of sanctions intended to destroy the Russian economy. Analysts initially believed that the Russian economy would bear the brunt of the war’s costs, but the exact opposite happened.

The EU was already upset and angry about this, but now that the sanctions are over, the Russian economy is still strong. The EU members are now, albeit belatedly, reaching agreement on the realities.

The EU has seen a series of internal rifts in the wake of sanctions imposed on Russia by the European Union. The poorer nations of the EU have been demanding a waiver of sanctions against Russia as they remain the most affected. But now what comes as a shock to the EU is the criticism it is now facing from the heavyweights of the bloc.” (Singh, 2022)

The EU has seen a series of internal rifts in the wake of sanctions imposed on Russia by the European Union. The poorer nations of the EU have been demanding a waiver of sanctions against Russia as they remain the most affected. But what has surprised the EU is the criticism it is now receiving from the bloc’s heavyweights.” (Singh, 2022)

The EU has agreed to ease curbs on Russian fertilizer exports as part of a new sanctions package, drawing a rebuke from Ukraine. The issue was only resolved after EU leaders sent the issue back to ambassadors to break the deadlock, diplomats said. It had pitted Western Europeans calling to loosen restrictions on Russia’s fertilizer exports against Eastern caucus led by Poland. (EU Agrees to Ease Russia Fertilizer Curbs After Row, Angering Ukraine, 2022)

Six Western European nations called for a clearer carveout to unblock fertiliser shipments that are currently stuck in port due to intermediaries’ worries that handling such cargoes would subject them to liability for violations..

Four Eastern members warned that any greater leeway would bail out President Vladimir Putin and the crony oligarchs who own Russia’s fertiliser industry, allowing the Kremlin to continue funding its aggression in Ukraine. If no EU members object by Friday lunch, the deal will go into effect. It limited and specificized language, which was important for Poland and the Baltics. Western countries were glad for more clarity.